Great hitting video excerpt on YouTube

One of the problems that seems to come up a lot with hitting is that the folks who are teaching it often make it way over-complicated. They put in a lot of steps, get lost in a lot of minutae, and ultimately leave the hitter more confused than when he/she started.

This video excerpt  on YouTube does a great job of simplifying the concept of what is often called rotational hitting — using the big muscles of the body to rotate the body, and ultimately the bat — into the ball to develop more power. Ken van Bogaert does a great job of explaining why you want to use this technique, how it works, and even provides a little info on some drills to help develop this type of swing.

What’s particularly interesting about it is Ken doesn’t use clips of steroid-enhanced athletes to make his points. You can find those all over the Internet. Instead, he shows young baseball players who are still in the learning phase. While their swings may not be perfect, you can see how over time they will be well ahead of other kids who don’t learn these techniques. After all, it’s one thing to teach the enormously gifted how to swing. It’s another to get the same type of results out of the average kid who’s on your team.

The clip is there to entice you to buy the full video. (Fair disclosure: I was a consultant on the video, although I receive no compensation as a result of it.) It’s worth the investment, especially if you’re struggling to learn all the terms and techniques that Mike Candrea, Sue Enquist, and many others are espousing. Ken keeps it nice and simple.

The players shown are all baseball players, but that’s ok. It’s the same swing. The principles apply just as well to softball. I know. I’ve used them myself for years.

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About Ken Krause

Ken Krause has been coaching girls fastpitch softball for nearly 20 years. Some may know him as a contributing columnist to Softball Magazine, where he writes Krause's Korner -- a regular column sponsored by Louisville Slugger. Ken is also the Administrator of the Discuss Fastpitch Forum, the most popular fastpitch discussion forum on the Internet. He is currently a Three Star Master Coach with the National Fastpitch Coaches Association (NFCA), and is certified by both the Amateur Softball Association (ASA) and American Sports Education Program (ASEP). Ken is a private instructor specializing in pitchers, hitters, and catchers. He teaches at North Shore Baseball Academy in Libertyville, IL and Pro-Player Consultants in McHenry, IL.

Posted on March 6, 2008, in Hitting. Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. John Armstrong

    There are some good things from this clip. I especially like the “ba-boom” idea for young hitters.One thing I don’t like it the teaching of the front arm extending at contact. I think it gets its first mention around the 2:20 mark.The kids in the video also have some bad bat drag. The one frozen at 7:45 jumps out at me.

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  2. I think Ken may be changing the front arm extending. He is constantly tweaking the program, especially as he applies what he thinks to actual hitters. Sometimes hitting ideas, like communism, works best in theory. None of the kids in the videos have great swings yet. But the potential is there. I like the fact that he used works in progress rather than polished pros to demonstrate it. They’re a little rough as far as models go, but they’re more realistic for comparison. We all wish our kids could swing like Bonds or Giambi — but then a lot of pros wish they could too! It’s tough to compare your 10 year old with that!

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  3. Really? I watched 1:45 and saw one swing that wasn’t horrendous. Does it get better later in the video? Bat drag, counter rotation, hand dropping etc. Simple? Seriously? Ken, I think you need to quit thinking of the swing as a collection of bits and cues and learn the underlying principles. It really becomes simple as you desire then. Getting someone to change habits becomes the tricky part rather than understanding what is happening and what should be happening.

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